February
Rob Latchford, one of our senior project managers and technical support, has contributed his expertise in localization to iGaming Businesss magazine. Although it’s an industry-specific magazine, the article applies to anyone dealing with translation and localization. Click the link to read the article.

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September
In the early 20th century, Ludwig Wittgenstein argued that the language we speak can influence the way humans think and act. Since then, others have taken different views and argued that everyone around the world shares a common grammar and language does not significantly affect our behaviour. But recent research by Keith Chen of Yale Business School seems to back those who believe that language can have a direct influence on the way we live our lives.

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September
When people think of the defining characteristics of a good translator, they immediately think of their linguistic prowess. It's the same assumption made by many an aspiring translator. They may be highly proficient at languages, possibly speaking several in addition to their mother tongue, and those that are bilingual must be the best of all, right? While proficiency in languages is most certainly a prerequisite for  becoming a translator, a talent for writing is often overlooked. If translation were simply a matter of finding the equivalent words and phrasing from one language to another, then bilingualism would certainly be a great advantage and machine translation might eventually fulfill this role. But what sets humans and machines apart, and great translators from good ones, is the creativity and writing skill involved. There are thousands of translators out there who are excellent linguists but it is surprising how few of them are also

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August
In the last blog post we introduced machine translation (MT), why it could be perceived as a threat to the professional translation industry and what its limitations are.  In this blog we'll look at some of those themes more closely and explore how the two can co-exist. Just recently, Google's Babel project hit the news. Details are short but it promises to be a technology that will allow two people to speak to each other over the phone in their native language while Google translates for them. Fans of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy will remember the Babel Fish, which could be inserted into the ear and used to understand any language in the world! This is what Google (and others) are reportedly going after and what an amazing futuristic technology it would be. It's worth pointing out here that it sounds more of an interpreting tool, rather than a

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July
The 50-ton elephant in any translator's room these days is machine translation, or MT for short. Not that all translators are necessarily worried about it, but it's a big beast that refuses to be ignored. And more importantly, it's being embraced by the non-translation community, lovingly embraced in fact, which means linguists everywhere should get used to its presence and maybe even hop on to the castle on top and guide it. First, let's look at what MT is. Essentially, machine translation is the use of computer software to automatically translate from one language to another. Humans are not involved other than feeding in the text and walking away with the results. It is mostly commonly used on the Internet where users can translate web pages at the click of a button, or enter text into a box to get the results. It can also be integrated into other software or

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June
There are two fundamental ways to learn a language: learning through classic educational means, and then there's the way we all first learned our native tongue— the baby way. Chances are that if you're reading this, then any new languages you want to learn will have to be done through classic educational means, which may involve classes, online study, books, CDs, etc. Even if you decide to live in a certain country and immerse yourself in the culture, you are still likely to approach the language from an adult perspective, using logic, deduction and comparison. If you decided to live with a tribe in the rainforest with no access to any pedagogical material, you would still eventually learn that language and get much closer to learning the way babies do. But the inescapable fact is that once you have already learned a language, you can never go back to that

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